DermaLase Medical Laser and IPL Training

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Laser Safety Officer Course

Course Outline

 

 

 

Every organisation within which laser equipment of Class 3B or Class 4 is in use should appoint an internal Laser Safety Officer to take administrative responsibility on behalf of the employer for overseeing laser safety.

 

The Laser Safety Officer should ensure that adequate controls for minimising health risks arising from the use of laser equipment are in place, that regular monitoring of laser hazards and of the effectiveness of control measures is carried out, and that records of such monitoring are maintained.

Overall responsibility for laser safety remains with the employer, who should ensure that the person appointed as the Laser Safety Officer has the capability, knowledge and understanding, as well the resources needed, to undertake these tasks effectively. Within large organisations having extensive laser use it can often be helpful to appoint area or departmental laser safety representatives to assist the Laser Safety Officer and to provide more local support to laser users.


 

The standard of competence necessary for a Laser Safety Officer is that he or she should:

know that optical radiation encompasses visible light and invisible infrared and ultraviolet radiation, that it is designated in terms of wavelength, and that it differs from ionising radiation,

know the basic characteristics (spatial, spectral and temporal) of laser emission,

understand the appropriate quantities and units in which laser emission is specified,

know of the existence of relevant laser safety standards and national regulations affecting laser use,

understand the concept of laser hazard classes 1, 1M, 2, 2M, 3R, 3B and 4, and the meaning of laser warning labels,

know the type(s) of laser equipment in use within the organisation concerned and understand their intended purpose.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

know the wavelength(s) of emission of the laser equipment in use,

know the tissue(s) at risk from laser beam exposure, and in the case of laser emission within the retinal hazard region (wavelengths between 400 and 1400 nm) understand the focusing effects of the eye,

appreciate the severity of harm that may occur from laser beam exposure,

know the approximate area around the laser(s) within which hazardous exposure levels may arise under different circumstances of use,

understand the nature and extent of other hazards that may arise from the use of the laser equipment, including the following:

mechanical hazards;
electrical hazards;
noise and vibration hazards;
thermal hazards;
fire and explosion hazards;
chemical hazards;
biological hazards;
radiation hazards,

in addition to those due to laser emission,

understand the control procedures that are necessary to eliminate the risk of harm occurring or to reduce this risk to an acceptable level, including the proper use of warning signs and controlled areas,

understand the essential requirements of occupational health & safety and the general principles of good safety management,

understand the need to establish, document and implement safe working procedures (covering normal operation, adjustment work, and the occurrence of unplanned events, including accidents),

have sufficient technical understanding and management ability to be able to take administrative responsibility, on behalf of the employer, for over-seeing, regular monitoring, and the continuous control of laser hazards within the organisation, having due regard to the type(s) of laser(s) in use, the specific nature of the laser application(s), the people involved in the work, and the kind(s) of working environment(s) concerned,

know how to respond to laser-related accidents and to other incidents where safety could be compromised,

know how to seek, and be able to act on, the specialist advice of a Laser Protection Adviser whenever necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

It is preferable if candidates have some prior laser experience, but notessesntial. Please ask us if you are unsure whether you should consider this course.

 
 
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